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40% off - YuCARE MultiVits Adult Dogs £20.99 £34.99

Nutritional support for everyday wellness in a tasty, soft bite

40% off - YuCARE MultiVits Young Dogs £20.99 £34.99

Nutritional support for everyday wellness in a tasty, soft bite

40% off - YuCARE MultiVits Senior Dogs £23.99 £39.99

Nutritional support for everyday wellness in a tasty, soft bite

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40% off - YuCARE MultiVits Adult Dogs £20.99 £34.99

Nutritional support for everyday wellness in a tasty, soft bite

40% off - YuCARE MultiVits Young Dogs £20.99 £34.99

Nutritional support for everyday wellness in a tasty, soft bite

40% off - YuCARE MultiVits Senior Dogs £23.99 £39.99

Nutritional support for everyday wellness in a tasty, soft bite

The dangers of autumn

Seasonal hazards when walking your dog

It’s that time of year again. The nights are drawing in, Strictly’s back on TV and everything is available in pumpkin spice flavour. As we welcome all the excitement of autumn, it’s also worth remembering that when you’re bundling up and heading out for chilly dog walks, there are some seasonal dangers to keep an eye out for. While some may be common sense, others may be more unexpected, so we’re here to get you clued up on how to keep your pooch safe and healthy during these autumn months…

Dark evenings

If you and your dog tend to venture out in areas that aren’t well lit – think country lanes and footpaths – walking at the beginning and end of the day can feel a bit daunting. But it needn’t be if you heed our advice. It’s best to keep your dog on a lead as much as possible – bonus points for a reflective lead, harness or dog coat, which will help you stand out to drivers and other walkers in those misty mornings. Stick to familiar routes on main, well-lit roads, so you can be easily seen, and always dress appropriately. Warmth and visibility are the watchwords – we recommend a thick waterproof coat, hardy footwear, and a high-vis vest or head torch.

Wet fallen leaves

One of the best things about autumn is the glorious display of colourful leaves that Mother Nature treats us to. However, once they’ve settled on the ground, this can present a few dangers you need to be aware of. Firstly, fallen leaves plus rain equals an accident waiting to happen. Both you and your dog could easily lose your footing on those slippery leaves, and that could result in spraining or breaking something. And don’t forget there are often perils lurking beneath the leaves – hidden dog poo or, much more dangerous, broken glass. If you do find a piece of glass in your pooch’s paw, don’t attempt to remove it yourself, as it could cause more damage. Pay a visit to your vet as soon as you can.

Joint stiffness

We often hear the old wives’ tale that the cold can wreak havoc with your joints, not to mention your dog’s. But is there any truth to it? Well, sort of. Joint issues tend to be aggravated, not by the cold or damp, but more so by the changes in barometric pressure, decreased levels of activity and increased nerve sensitivity. So, if your dog isn’t bounding out the door like usual when you shout, “Walkies!”, and is limping or whimpering when moving, it could be down to joint stiffness. To ease these doggy aches, check out our range of joint supplements, such as YuMOVE Dog, which uses a well-loved formula that soothes and supports joint health. They’ll be back wagging their tail at the w-word in no time.

Conkers

Although conker tournaments don’t happen as much in school playgrounds anymore, conkers are still a well-known sign that autumn is in full swing. Around September, those shiny mahogany seeds fall from horse chestnut trees, contained in bright green spikey shells. And once they burst open, the contents can be irresistible to kids of all ages. But what about your fur children? As a rule, dogs aren’t that interested in them, thanks to their bitter taste. However, they can be extremely poisonous for dogs if they do decide to give them a chew, so it’s important to stay vigilant for conker-heavy areas when out and about. Keep a particularly watchful eye on puppies who, thanks to their inquisitive natures, are especially tempted by those glossy “toys” they find on the ground. Since conkers can be choking hazards as well as being toxic to dogs, if you think your canine companion has eaten one, you should take them to your vet without delay. To find out more about the dangers of conkers to dogs, check out our blogpost.

Wild mushrooms

Come autumn, you’ll see mushrooms popping up all over the place – most commonly in woodland areas, but you may find some in your garden, too. Some wild mushrooms are poisonous to dogs – depending which species they’ve snaffled – and your pooch can become very ill if they eat them. Teaching your dog to “Leave it!” if they spy a mushroom is a great start, but it’s also a good idea to clear any suspect-looking fungi from your lawn as part of your gardening routine. Even though a whopping 99% of mushrooms in the UK are edible and completely harmless, if always important to err on the side of safety and make sure your dog stays steers clear of all mushrooms. It also can’t hurt to do your homework and swot up on the most dangerous kinds – the fairytale mushrooms with their iconic red spotted caps are just one example. Suspect your dog has eaten a wild mushroom? Get them straight to your vet, with a sample of the mushroom, if possible. That way, your vet will know how to best treat your canine companion.

Fallen fruit

The poet Keats may have waxed lyrical about autumn fruits, but those fallen apples are certainly not dog’s best friend. Once they’ve fallen from the tree and have been left for a while, they start to go bad and ferment – this rotten fruit contains toxins that can cause dangerous convulsions and muscle tremors in dogs. What’s more, fermented fruit produces alcohol, which is a definite no-no for your pooch. Other fallen fruit, such as plums, contain stones that can cause sickness and diarrhoea, and even make it difficult for your dog to breath. If you do have apple or fruit trees in your garden, always throw away produce that drops to the ground, and check for windfalls. And always keep an eye out for tempting fruit on the ground when you’re out for walkies.

Seasonal canine illness

Seasonal canine illness – or SCI – most commonly affects dogs between August and November, so is definitely one to watch out for come autumn. As it stands, SCI has no known cause, but impacts dogs shortly after walking in woodland. And sadly it can be fatal if it’s not treated early enough. It’s usually 24-72 hours after walking in wooded spots that canines become unwell, and the main warning signs to keep an eye out for include vomiting, diarrhoea, loss of appetite, abdominal pain and muscle tremors. It’s important to take your dog to your vet as swiftly as possible, if you suspect they have SCI. So, what can be done to help them? Fluids and antibiotics can be administered by your vet, and thankfully most dogs recover quickly from this illness.

Do you have any top tips on keeping your dog safe in autumn? We’re all (pricked) ears! Head over to our Facebook and Instagram pages to share your advice and stories – we’d love to hear from you.
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